The world always looks brighter from behind a smile

Donating Blood Benefits You, Too!

Posted by on Mar 21, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

A whopping 5 million Americans are in need of a blood transfusion every year – that’s a lot of blood! It’s common to hear about the positive impact donated blood has on the lives of those in need , but what about the benefits for the individuals donating the blood? In addition to helping save lives across the world, there are health benefits both psychologically and physically for donors, too! According to the Mental Health Foundation, donating blood can help improve your emotional state by reducing stress, and eliminating negative feelings. Not to mention, giving blood has been found to improve cardiovascular health, and lower the risk of cancer, obesity, and hemochromatosis. It also helps in lowering the risk of damage to the liver and pancreas. Here’s how:

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Save your Child from the Most Common Chronic Childhood Disease

Posted by on Mar 16, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Parents try their hardest to keep their kids from experiencing harm and pain. It can be heartbreaking to see your child or loved one suffer from tooth aches and tooth decay. No matter the age, babies, kids, teens, adults, and elders can unfortunately develop dental cavities. It is commonly known that tooth decay develops as bacteria feed off of the left-over food particles on our teeth by producing acids that wear down tooth enamel. But, you may be wondering, “how is tooth decay possible for babies who aren’t even consuming solid foods?” You may have heard of the term, baby bottle tooth decay, which is a leading factor for a high rate of cavities in babies who particularly go to sleep with a bottle of milk or juice in their crib.  Milk, which we know to be good for bone growth and development, does contain sugar so when it is constantly in contact on baby teeth throughout the night, it can lead to the development of cavities and future oral health problems for little ones. Baby bottle tooth decay can also be a sign that nutrients and natural healthy bacteria that help fight cavities may be out of balance in your child. When baby teeth become decayed, not only can it affect incoming permanent teeth, but also can negatively impact chewing, drinking, speaking, and the growth of the mouth. The decay may present itself with this appearance:

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Each Bite Counts: National Nutrition Month

Posted by on Mar 10, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

The popular saying, “You are what you eat,” reminds us that a healthy diet is important in order to keep our bodies healthy, vibrant, and energized. National Nutrition Month is a yearly initiative each March created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to educate individuals on healthy food choices. What we eat on a daily basis not only effects our general health, but also the health of our teeth and gums. In fact, the initial signs of poor nutrition can often first be seen in the mouth.

Healthy teeth aren’t just a result of daily toothbrushing and flossing…nutrition plays a major role, too! It is important to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups.

Here are some tips to help you make informed choices on foods and beverages that are tooth-friendly and heart-healthy:

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Your Pet’s Smile Matters, Too!

Posted by on Mar 5, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Pets, otherwise known as the cute protectors and furry additions to the family, face some of the same dental problems that we do as humans. In fact, oral disease is the most common major health problem of cats and dogs. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, more than 70% of cats and 80% of dogs exhibit signs of oral disease by the age of 3. Although tooth decay remains the top oral problem that humans experience, pets primarily develop periodontal disease and fractures of teeth.

The same rules of dental disease that apply to us also apply to our furry companions. It may be easy to forget that your pet’s teeth are also a part of their overall health and well-being. Dogs and cats in particular often experience a buildup of tartar, a form of hardened dental plaque caused by bacteria, when their teeth are not cleaned overtime. This buildup of tartar eventually leads to gum irritation and bone loss that exposes the roots of their teeth. The harmful bacteria can then enter the bloodstream and affect systemic organs, including the heart, kidneys, and liver.

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The Fight Against the Opioid Crisis

Posted by on Feb 27, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

The opioid crisis is a major public health emergency that has sadly resulted in the loss of many lives. According to the (NIH) National Institute on Drug Abuse, the deaths from opioid use increased from 18,515 in 2007 to 47,600 deaths in 2017. It has been found that for every day that passes, about 130 people in America die from an opioid overdose. Opioids, including Vicodin, Percocet, Morphine, Codeine, and Oxycodone, to name a few, are categoriezed as narcotics, and can be an effective pain management option prescribed by medical professionals after a procedure like wisdom teeth extractions. However, abuse of opioids has become a dangerous issue, with almost 29% of patients misusing them when prescribed. Opioids do provide pain-relief, but they also trigger your body to release the hormone dopamine, which in turn can lead to addition due to the experience of pleasure signaled to your brain. Even so, abuse of opioids can lead individuals to abuse other dangerous drugs such as heroin. Misusing opioids can lead to depressed airways and ultimately death.

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Have Teeth that are Too Big or Too Small?

Posted by on Feb 23, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Although not frequently common, you may know someone or yourself experience having a tooth or teeth that are smaller or larger than normal in size. When adult permanent teeth appear to be smaller, or similar to the size of baby teeth, this condition is known as Microdontia. Microdontia commonly affects the upper lateral incisors, and are often referred to as peg laterals. On the other hand, if the teeth are larger than usual, this is known as Macrodontia. When every tooth is affected by Macrodontia, this is typically due to the rare condition pituitary gigantism, which is seen in children and affects other parts of the body such as the feet and hands. Both conditions have been mainly associated with genetics. However, other causes including certain syndromes, unilateral facial hypoplasia, gigantism, and hormonal imbalance, for instance, could be contributing factors.

Macrodontia and Microdontia can create some issues for people, including crowding or excess space, teeth misalignment, and even impact someone’s confidence in smiling. The discrepancy between the upper and lower relationship of teeth when biting together as a result of macrodontia or microdontia could cause individuals to have trouble chewing or speaking. It can also lead to excessive wear on the teeth. Luckily, there are ways to correct macrodontia and microdontia with certain treatment options.

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The Perfect Smile for Valentine’s Day

Posted by on Feb 14, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Today on Valentine’s Day we are reminded of all of the love that surrounds us. Pink and red flowers, cards, and treats may also make an appearance on this holiday. As we celebrate, make sure you’re showing your smile some love too! Here’s some tips on how you can keep your pearly whites glistening on your special date or day with loved ones:

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