Abnormal Tooth Enamel: Amelogenesis Imperfecta

Posted by on Mar 17, 2016 in Blogs | 0 comments

 enamelAmelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder in which tooth enamel forms abnormally. As a result, individuals with this condition are at a higher risk of developing cavities. It typically causes teeth to be smaller than usual, discolored, grooved, easily damaged, among other dental problems that can vary by the individual. Secondary effects could be early tooth loss, periodontal disease, tooth sensitivity, and jaw problems.

Unfortunately, Amelogenesis imperfecta can negatively impact both primary teeth and permanent teeth. Around 14 forms of this condition have been determined by researchers. It has also been found to affect approximately 1 in 700 people in northern Sweden to 1 in 14,000 people in the United States.


Many cases of Amelogenesis imperfecta are a result of mutations in the AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and FAM83H genes, which are normally responsible for making proteins essential for normal tooth and enamel development (ameloblastin, enamelin, tuftelin and amelogenin). Tooth enamel is a hard outer layer rich in calcium that functions to protect the tooth. As a result of a mutation, tooth enamel becomes thin and weaker than normal, and may even appear yellow or brown in color. The genetic causes of other cases have not yet been identified.

This condition can be inherited in both an autosomal dominant pattern and autosomal recessive pattern. In an autosomal dominant pattern, once copy of the mutated gene in each cell can cause Amelogenesis imperfecta. An autosomal recessive pattern involves two mutated copies of the gene in each cell. Researchers found that around 5 percent of amelogenesis imperfecta cases are due to mutations in the AMELX gene and are inherited in an X-linked pattern. They also found that males with X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta have more severe dental problems than females with this form of the condition.

Preventive and restorative dental treatments can help make teeth impacted by this condition look normal and remain healthy. Full crown restorations are often used to treat this disorder. For severe cases, teeth may have to be extracted and implants or dentures may be required. If you feel like you have Amelogenesis imperfecta or any other enamel conditions, our very Dr. Ejaz Ali is an expert at fixing the issue, bringing the teeth back to ideal form, function, and esthetic. Dr. Ali was trained at Tufts School of Dental Medicine, and also did additional training at New York University’s in “Full Mouth Reconstruction: Advanced Principles and Practice for the GP” with special focus on Implants, Aesthetics, and Occlusion.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.


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