Posts Tagged "cavities"

My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

Posted by on Apr 17, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

It’s that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that’s not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children’s teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here’s how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

Read More

Save your Child from the Most Common Chronic Childhood Disease

Posted by on Mar 16, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Parents try their hardest to keep their kids from experiencing harm and pain. It can be heartbreaking to see your child or loved one suffer from tooth aches and tooth decay. No matter the age, babies, kids, teens, adults, and elders can unfortunately develop dental cavities. It is commonly known that tooth decay develops as bacteria feed off of the left-over food particles on our teeth by producing acids that wear down tooth enamel. But, you may be wondering, “how is tooth decay possible for babies who aren’t even consuming solid foods?” You may have heard of the term, baby bottle tooth decay, which is a leading factor for a high rate of cavities in babies who particularly go to sleep with a bottle of milk or juice in their crib.  Milk, which we know to be good for bone growth and development, does contain sugar so when it is constantly in contact on baby teeth throughout the night, it can lead to the development of cavities and future oral health problems for little ones. Baby bottle tooth decay can also be a sign that nutrients and natural healthy bacteria that help fight cavities may be out of balance in your child. When baby teeth become decayed, not only can it affect incoming permanent teeth, but also can negatively impact chewing, drinking, speaking, and the growth of the mouth. The decay may present itself with this appearance:

Read More

Each Bite Counts: National Nutrition Month

Posted by on Mar 10, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

The popular saying, “You are what you eat,” reminds us that a healthy diet is important in order to keep our bodies healthy, vibrant, and energized. National Nutrition Month is a yearly initiative each March created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to educate individuals on healthy food choices. What we eat on a daily basis not only effects our general health, but also the health of our teeth and gums. In fact, the initial signs of poor nutrition can often first be seen in the mouth.

Healthy teeth aren’t just a result of daily toothbrushing and flossing…nutrition plays a major role, too! It is important to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups.

Here are some tips to help you make informed choices on foods and beverages that are tooth-friendly and heart-healthy:

Read More

The Perfect Smile for Valentine’s Day

Posted by on Feb 14, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Today on Valentine’s Day we are reminded of all of the love that surrounds us. Pink and red flowers, cards, and treats may also make an appearance on this holiday. As we celebrate, make sure you’re showing your smile some love too! Here’s some tips on how you can keep your pearly whites glistening on your special date or day with loved ones:

Read More

Experiencing Toothaches from Winter Weather?

Posted by on Jan 13, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

As you’re walking outside this winter, do you ever feel a cringing pain in your teeth from the cold air? Not only can the cold cause dry skin, it can also cause some tooth sensitivity, especially if you already struggle with sensitive teeth. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, approximately 40 million Americans have sensitive teeth. This causes many people to avoid foods that are either very cold or very hot, such as ice-cream or soup. So, why does tooth sensitivity occur?

Read More