Posts Tagged "children"

My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

Posted by on Apr 17, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

It’s that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that’s not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children’s teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here’s how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

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Is Your Body Trying to ask for Vitamins and Minerals?

Posted by on Apr 8, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

It’s been ingrained in us that a healthy and well-balanced diet is necessary for normal daily functioning and growth. However, it may not be that simple to realize when we’re deficient in certain vitamins and minerals, even when we’re eating healthy! Vitamins and minerals play a major role in carrying out the normal functions of our bodies, including synthesizing  tissues, removing waste products, and being necessary precursors for enzymes. Therefore, deficiencies can result in several health problems, so it is important to know what signs to look for in order to meet the body’s needs! For instance, oral signs such as burning tongue and mouth sores, feeling tired after a good night’s rest, having a pale appearance, or brittle fingernails can all be signs of particular nutrient deficiencies. In fact, it has been reported that when the proper nutrients are not consumed in adequate amounts, both physical and mental issues such as skin problems, bone abnormalities, and even dementia could be negative consequences.

Take a look at the signs of various vitamin deficiencies and how to make these symptoms improve or be gone altogether:

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Save your Child from the Most Common Chronic Childhood Disease

Posted by on Mar 16, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Parents try their hardest to keep their kids from experiencing harm and pain. It can be heartbreaking to see your child or loved one suffer from tooth aches and tooth decay. No matter the age, babies, kids, teens, adults, and elders can unfortunately develop dental cavities. It is commonly known that tooth decay develops as bacteria feed off of the left-over food particles on our teeth by producing acids that wear down tooth enamel. But, you may be wondering, “how is tooth decay possible for babies who aren’t even consuming solid foods?” You may have heard of the term, baby bottle tooth decay, which is a leading factor for a high rate of cavities in babies who particularly go to sleep with a bottle of milk or juice in their crib.  Milk, which we know to be good for bone growth and development, does contain sugar so when it is constantly in contact on baby teeth throughout the night, it can lead to the development of cavities and future oral health problems for little ones. Baby bottle tooth decay can also be a sign that nutrients and natural healthy bacteria that help fight cavities may be out of balance in your child. When baby teeth become decayed, not only can it affect incoming permanent teeth, but also can negatively impact chewing, drinking, speaking, and the growth of the mouth. The decay may present itself with this appearance:

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The Fight Against the Opioid Crisis

Posted by on Feb 27, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

The opioid crisis is a major public health emergency that has sadly resulted in the loss of many lives. According to the (NIH) National Institute on Drug Abuse, the deaths from opioid use increased from 18,515 in 2007 to 47,600 deaths in 2017. It has been found that for every day that passes, about 130 people in America die from an opioid overdose. Opioids, including Vicodin, Percocet, Morphine, Codeine, and Oxycodone, to name a few, are categoriezed as narcotics, and can be an effective pain management option prescribed by medical professionals after a procedure like wisdom teeth extractions. However, abuse of opioids has become a dangerous issue, with almost 29% of patients misusing them when prescribed. Opioids do provide pain-relief, but they also trigger your body to release the hormone dopamine, which in turn can lead to addition due to the experience of pleasure signaled to your brain. Even so, abuse of opioids can lead individuals to abuse other dangerous drugs such as heroin. Misusing opioids can lead to depressed airways and ultimately death.

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Bacteria’s Pathway from Mouth to Brain

Posted by on Feb 9, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

It’s very reasonable to think that gum disease will only impact your gums, and therefore only cause issues within your mouth. But, surprisingly, the bacteria associated with chronic gum disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), has been found in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.

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