Posts Tagged "gum disease"

My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

Posted by on Apr 17, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

It’s that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that’s not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children’s teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here’s how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

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Your Pet’s Smile Matters, Too!

Posted by on Mar 5, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Pets, otherwise known as the cute protectors and furry additions to the family, face some of the same dental problems that we do as humans. In fact, oral disease is the most common major health problem of cats and dogs. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, more than 70% of cats and 80% of dogs exhibit signs of oral disease by the age of 3. Although tooth decay remains the top oral problem that humans experience, pets primarily develop periodontal disease and fractures of teeth.

The same rules of dental disease that apply to us also apply to our furry companions. It may be easy to forget that your pet’s teeth are also a part of their overall health and well-being. Dogs and cats in particular often experience a buildup of tartar, a form of hardened dental plaque caused by bacteria, when their teeth are not cleaned overtime. This buildup of tartar eventually leads to gum irritation and bone loss that exposes the roots of their teeth. The harmful bacteria can then enter the bloodstream and affect systemic organs, including the heart, kidneys, and liver.

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Bacteria’s Pathway from Mouth to Brain

Posted by on Feb 9, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

It’s very reasonable to think that gum disease will only impact your gums, and therefore only cause issues within your mouth. But, surprisingly, the bacteria associated with chronic gum disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), has been found in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.

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What’s the Scoop on Floss & Toxicity?

Posted by on Jan 31, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Did you hear the news? It seems like floss was all the talk when news broke out about Oral-B Glide floss potentially containing toxic chemicals. A recent study published in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology claimed that flossing was not safe due to the Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) found in certain floss brands. So what’s PFAS? These chemicals have been linked to some health problems, but are used in a variety of products sold in the market, ranging from cooking appliances, electronics, clothing, and food wrappers for the purpose of adding water resistance and non-stick properties.

But, don’t be so quick to quit flossing! Here’s why:

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Are Your Gums Affected by your Blood Sugar Levels?

Posted by on Jan 23, 2019 in Blogs | 0 comments

Diabetes, which impacts about 30 million people in the United States, surprisingly doesn’t just affect your blood sugar. Research has consistently showed that gum disease, including both gingivitis and periodontitis, is linked with diabetes. The relationship between gum disease and diabetes works both ways: individuals with diabetes have a higher chance of developing gum disease, and people with severe gum disease are more prone to have issues controlling their blood glucose levels.

Early stages of gum problems begin as gingivitis, also described as inflammation of the gums. As bacteria invade the gum pockets and inflammation remains, gum recession and bone loss begin to occur in the more severe stages of gum disease, known as periodontitis.  People who have diabetes unfortunately have a a harder time clearing bacterial infections, which they are also more at risk for developing. That’s why having good oral hygiene practices is so important, especially if you have diabetes or a current diagnosis of periodontal disease. Take a look at how you can manage your oral care with diabetes:

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