Posts Tagged "periodontal disease"

What’s the Point in Replacing Missing Teeth?

Posted by on Dec 2, 2018 in Blogs | 0 comments

It is important to replace lost teeth, but why? The average adult begins with 32 teeth, which consists of incisors, canines, premolars, molars, and wisdom teeth. This full dentition allows us to eat healthy and nutritious foods such as nuts, vegetables, and protein, as well as speak, and smile. However, as we age and move through life, people may lose a tooth due to trauma, tooth decay, or periodontal disease. Missing teeth won’t just cause a gap in your smile, but can lead to problems with your remaining teeth, gums, and overall structure of your mouth and jaws. Overtime, even if only one tooth is lost, the bone where the tooth used to be will begin to atrophy, which can change the appearance of your face by causing the jaw to look sunken. Not to mention, missing teeth can cause surrounding teeth to shift and make it easier for bacterial plaque to build up.

Fortunately, there are a lot of ways to replace missing teeth:

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Brush Your Teeth, Your Heart Will Thank You

Posted by on Nov 11, 2018 in Blogs | 0 comments

Who would have thought that your dentist would be telling you how to help prevent heart disease? It’s commonly known that smoking, a poor diet, lack of exercise, and an uncontrolled weight can impact your heart. However, did you know that brushing your teeth is linked with maintaining a healthy heart? Research published in Scotland revealed that brushing your teeth can lower your risk of experiencing a heart attack or other issues impacting your heart.

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Dentists Recommending Chewing Gum: Too Good to be True?

Posted by on Oct 10, 2018 in Blogs | 0 comments

October is National Dental Hygiene Month, which is the perfect time to spread awareness on good oral hygiene practices, including brushing, flossing, rinsing, and possibly to your surprise, chewing gum! This may sound alarming because gum, like candy, is known to cause tooth decay. However, chewing sugarless gum after eating can be beneficial to your teeth for many reasons. This is particularly the case when chewing sugar-free gum that is sweetened with the ingredient xylitol.

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September Is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

Posted by on Sep 5, 2018 in Blogs | 0 comments

What is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month?

Did you know that over 23 million children are obese or overweight in the United States? National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month is a yearly campaign with the goal of letting individuals know the health hazards of obesity, particularly for children. Approximately one third of children in the U.S. are at risk of type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease. But, with the knowledge and proper resources, we can make these statistics and the health of our children better. Several organizations and professionals will be joining together especially this month to raise money, conduct research, and provide treatment to help battle childhood obesity.

Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem that can have a lifelong impact on the overall health. Chronic conditions such as asthma, joint issues, Type 2 diabetes, and sleep apnea may develop at higher rates due to childhood obesity. Also, it has been found that children with obesity often are more likely to experience depression and lower self-esteem. Surprisingly, obesity is also linked with an increased risk of developing periodontal disease due to the body’s inflammatory response.

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Do you like a lot of sauce on your food? Here’s how your teeth are taking it

Posted by on Apr 1, 2018 in Blogs | 1 comment

It’s hard to resist dipping french fries in ketchup, adding a extra dressing on salad, or smothering steak in steak sauce. After all, all we crave is a little added taste for our food. Ketchup is basically crushed tomatoes, right? Actually, one bottle of ketchup contains approximately 33 teaspoons of sugar! 

One of the main reasons why sauce is unhealthy and bad for your teeth is due to the added sugars and acidity of the sauces. The acid weakens your enamel, while the added sugars feed bacteria in your mouth. Both of these elements ultimately result in an increased prevalence of cavities. In addition to the negative effects on your oral health, the added calories in sauce on your food is also not ideal for maintaining a healthy diet.

Sometimes it is hard to interpret how much sugar is in a sauce (or any other food at that) by just reading the grams off of the nutritional label. There are tools you can use on your smartphone or computer that let you see how many tablespoons of sugar are in foods.

TIPS:

-Always use sauce in your foods in moderation.

-Brush your teeth after meals, or at least after you’ve had a heavy meal.

-Read nutritional labels on food packaging and watch out for how many grams of sugar are in it.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References:

http://www.sugarstacks.com/sauces.htm

http://www.happilyunprocessed.com/2014/10/09/shocking-sugar-finds/

 

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